Nursing Bullying

Nursing Bullying

Prevalence:

Workplace incivility, lateral violence and bullying are described as a continuum related to their intensity, frequency and presence of intention to harm the target.

Prevalence of these phenomena in the nursing profession is variable, reaching considerable values:

Save your time - order a paper!

Get your paper written from scratch within the tight deadline. Our service is a reliable solution to all your troubles. Place an order on any task and we will take care of it. You won’t have to worry about the quality and deadlines

Order Paper Now

87% for lateral violence

81% for bullying

 

EX of lateral violence: Being hypercritical, Blaming or put-downs, Criticizing without solutions, Exclusion, Gossip, Intimidation, Refusing to help or support, Sabotage, Shouting or other unprofessional conduct, Unfair assignments, snide comments, sarcasm, belittling gestures or comments, inappropriate or unjust evaluations, withholding information, holding grudges and displaying favoritism

U.S NAVY SEALS

The Nursing Profession should model…

 

LV: Stats & Correlations:

A significant positive correlation between lateral violence and work-related stress.

 

Lateral violence exerts a negative impact on job’s satisfaction.

 

At last, literature pointed out the link between lateral violence and the intent to quit from nursing career with a range from 11.3% to 30.5% of nurses victimized, decided to resign from their position.

 

From 6.9% up to 34% of the targets even consider quitting the profession.

Studies noted occurred internationally as well- including Italy, Turkey, Canada and U.S.

 

Bullying is a predictive factor for burnout and shows a negative correlation with job efficiency.

Victims of bullying recorded absenteeism 1.5 times higher in comparison to non-victimized peers..

78.5% of bullied nurses with length of service lower than 5 years resigned to move to other jobs.

Spector et al.(2014), showed from 136 studies:

36.4% was exposed to physical violence (PV) &

67.2% to the non-physical one (NPV).

** Europe, there was an exposure of the 35% to PV and 59.5 % to NPV **

LV: Stats & Correlations Continued:

 

Risk Factors for Workplace Bullying and Violence

unprofessional conducts, arguments about tasks, and disagreement on the nursing care strategy plus disappointment on peers’ job performance.

aggressions due to a failure in the adherence to protocols, right assignation of patients, limited resources, and high levels of nursing workload.

 

A quality analysis of IR’s r/t healthcare professionals has identified 2 main factors as possible catalysts for their occurrence: behaviour at work and job planning.

The first factor includes: unprofessional conducts, arguments about tasks, and disagreement on the nursing care strategy plus disappointment on peers’ job performance.

The second one includes possible conflicts and aggressions due to a failure in the adherence to protocols, right assignation of patients, limited resources, and high levels of nursing workload.

Related Factors Michelle

Consequential Outcomes:

In terms of emotional & physical impact, negative outcomes can seriously affect the victims (up to 75% of cases).

A wide range of physical and psychological symptoms may occur:

Decreased self-confidence

High levels of stress

Poor job satisfaction

Overreaction to mental stress

Psychological symptoms

Certified sick leave

Self-certified sick leave

Cardiovascular disease

Psychosomatic disorders

Chronic illness

 

 

Case Studies..Rose

According to a recent survey done by RNnetwork about 40 percent of nurses have reported incidents of verbal harassment either by physicians, patients, administration and fellow nurses. On the below graph from that survey, it is evident that nurses will experience the highest percentage of bullying from fellow nurses.

 

 

 

Research

 

 

 

Common Manifestations “looks like”

****** THIS WAS IN MY ARTICLE – Michelle

The most common manifestation of lateral violence is the psychological harassment resulting in hostility, as opposed to physical aggression.

These harassments include: verbal abuses- by an intimidating, malicious, and insulting pattern, threats, humiliations, intimidations, criticism, innuendo, social and professional exclusion, discouragement, disinterest, and denied access to information (3).

This specific type of harassment amounts to power-abuse, while the victims experience feelings of humiliation, menace, vulnerability and distress (4).

 

Eamples of lateral violence: Being hypercritical, Blaming or put-downs, Criticizing without solutions, Exclusion, Gossip, Intimidation, Refusing to help or support, Sabotage, Shouting or other unprofessional conduct, Unfair assignments, snide comments, sarcasm, belittling gestures or comments, inappropriate or unjust evaluations, withholding information, holding grudges and displaying favoritism

https://www.americanmobile.com/nursezone/nursing-news/lateral-violence-in-nursing-how-you-can-make-a-difference/

 

 

Video at clinical by group

 

 

 

Nursing Management

 

 

 

Implications..Monique

Nurses who are experiencing bullying behavior can take these steps:

Maintain a health view of self

Talk with a friend or collaeuge

Counseling to address emotional needs if indicated

Journaling

Exhibit assertive behavior

Confront bullying during or immediatly after incident

Report through proper channels

 

 

Prevention Kelvin

In most workplaces where risk factors can be identified, the risk of assault can be prevented or minimized if employers take appropriate

precautions. One of the best protections employers can offer their workers is to establish a zero-tolerance policy toward workplace violence.

This policy should cover all workers, patients, clients, visitors, contractors, and anyone else who may come in contact with company personnel.

By assessing their worksites, employers can identify methods for reducing the likelihood of incidents occurring. OSHA believes that a well-written

and implemented workplace violence prevention program, combined with engineering controls, administrative controls and training can reduce

the incidence of workplace violence in both the private sector and federal workplaces.

This can be a separate workplace violence prevention program or can be incorporated into a safety and health program, employee handbook, or

manual of standard operating procedures. It is critical to ensure that all workers know the policy and understand that all claims of workplace

violence will be investigated and remedied promptly. In addition, OSHA encourages employers to develop additional methods as necessary to

protect employees in high risk institutions of work.

 

 

 

 

In response to this unacceptable level of violence against health care workers, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has developed an online course to raise awareness of workplace violence among nurses and to help in the development of prevention strategies.

The NIOSH Workplace Violence Prevention for Nurses online training course contains units on what constitutes workplace violence, consequences of workplace violence for nurses and employers, and risk factors for both patient-on-worker violence and employee-on-employee violence. It also provides strategies nurses and organizations can use to prevent violence in their facilities. Each unit begins with a segment called “Nurses’ Voices” in which nurses who have experienced workplace violence give a brief testimonial and ends with an interactive self-check to make sure the nurse participant has understood the key concepts of the unit. The last five units are video case studies based on real-life examples of workplace violence.

 

 

 

 

 

Conclusion/Solutions & Outcomes..Claudia

 

 

 

Resources

 

 

 

Reference

Hartley, Daniel EdD, MS; Ridenour, Marilyn MPH, MBA, BSN; Wassell, James T. PhD, MS Workplace Violence Prevention for Nurses, AJN, American Journal of Nursing: September 2019 – Volume 119 – Issue 9 – p 19-20

doi: 10.1097/01.NAJ.0000580228.01504.0b

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6357596/

 

https://web-a-ebscohost-com.ezproxyqcc.helmlib.org/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?vid=3&sid=b3b527be-4e38-40ff-9e49-b3335bae7ba3%40sessionmgr4006

Hartley, Daniel EdD, MS; Ridenour, Marilyn MPH, MBA, BSN; Wassell, James T. PhD, MS Workplace Violence Prevention for Nurses, AJN, American Journal of Nursing: September 2019 – Volume 119 – Issue 9 – p 19-20

doi: 10.1097/01.NAJ.0000580228.01504.0b