Average Respiratory Rate at Rest and After Exercise Problem

Average Respiratory Rate at Rest and After Exercise Problem

Part 1: Assessing the effect of exercise 1. Measure respiratory rate, while at rest. While sitting quietly, record the number of breaths you take in one minute. This is your resting respiratory rate. Record this value in Table 1. 2. Repeat this procedure after exercise (vigorously walk up and down the hall or around the building once or go up and down the stairs twice) to determine your respiratory rate after exercise. Again, record your data in Table 1. 3. Using your hand or a stethoscope, determine our heart rate at rest and after exercise. Record the heartbeats per minute at rest, and then after exercise (similar to steps 1 and 2). Record your values in Table 1. +Table 1. The effect of exercise on heart rate and respiratory rate. At Rest After Exercise Respiratory Rate (breaths/min) Heart Rate (beats/min) Respiratory Rate (breaths/min) Heart Rate (beats/min) 4. Add the data that you collected in Table 1 to the class’ pooled data. To do so, access the shared Excel spreadsheet in Blackboard, ‘LabC2_Part1_Data’. Make sure to add your data to the correct lab day/group tab! 5. Once everyone has added their data, you will use the pooled class data to generate two graphs: 1) The average respiratory rate before and after exercise 2) The average heart rate before and after exercise Make sure that your graphs have all components of a good graph (see the Figure checklist and Excel tutorial 3) 6. Copy/paste your graphs into a Word document. Make sure that you include a descriptive caption under each graph. 7. Submit this Word document (or a pdf). Respiratory rate (breaths/min) At rest After exercise 13 17 Heart rate (beats/min) At rest After exercise 60 67 20 24 75 87 12 19 73 94 13 28 63 74 16 21 68 82 14 18 64 70 17 22 76 89 O O Figure Checklist: Graph shows the correct data Graph type best visualizes your dataset Bar graph: To compare between categories Scatter plot: To compare two numerical variables (often to find a relationship) Line plot: To show changes over time Pie chart: To compare percentages or distributions (Stacked bar plots tend to be better for this…pie charts are not used in biology all that often.) Independent variable is on the x-axis Dependent variable is on the y-axis Clearly and accurately labeled axes (with units) Axis lines on both axes (Excel does not do this automatically!) Error bars (if graphing a mean/median) Colors that are easy to distinguish (no neon!) Remove gridlines (these clutter the visual!) Include a caption (see below) Graphs with captions do not need titles! ロロロロロロロロ O ロロロ O O Figure Caption Checklist: Should be under the graph Start caption with “Figure 1.” for the first figure, “Figure 2.” for the second figure, etc Explain what the graph shows: Define variables (include units) Define error bars (if any) Define key (if any) If data were collected in the field, state where and when Include the species used Include the sample size: for example, n= 10 Include a summary of your results (statistics!) All figures must be referenced in the report text! For example, leaf length was longer in plants growing in the sun (Figure 1). O O O O O O

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